Below are the seminars presented by the Canadian Hydronics Council in 2018.                   
Presented by the Canadian Hydronics Council

Wednesday, November 7

Modifying Existing Hydronic System for Lower Water Temperatures
Time: 7:30 am – Continental Breakfast (pastries, coffee and tea)
           8:00 am – 11:30 am – Workshop
Instructor: John Siegenthaler, P.E., Appropriate Designs

The performance of many contemporary hydronic heat sources such as modulating condensing boilers, solar thermal collectors, heat pumps, and biomass boilers is significantly improved when they are combined with low temperature distribution systems. This session explains how to modify those systems to lower their required operating temperature, making them more compatible with modern (and future) heat sources.

Radiant Cooling with Dry Panel Systems

Time: 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Instructor: William Werthman, Senior Technical Advisor, Legend Valve & Fitting, Inc.

Dry panel systems can be a good option for many installations; you just need to know when to use them. During this learning lab, Bill will discuss the differences between wet and dry panel systems, when dry panel systems should be installed, control strategies, and combination systems. If you are looking to add radiant cooling to your service offerings then this session is the perfect place to start.

Heat Up Your Hydronic Sales - Tips to Grow Your Business

Time4:45 pm – 5:45 pm
Instructor: Matt Wiesenfeld, MBA, Program Manager, Canadian Hydronics Council

You’ll leave this session armed with new ideas and great tools to increase your hydronic sales.  This non-technical session will arm you with new ideas and great tools to increase your hydronic sales. It’s all about selling with more confidence and success.

Thursday, November 8

Documenting Hydronic Systems

Time: 7:30 am – Continental Breakfast (pastries, coffee and tea)
           
8:00 am – 11:30 am – Workshop
Instructor: John Siegenthaler, P.E., Appropriate Designs

Modern hydronics technology can be used to create very sophisticated and elaborate systems. While the original designer understands how the system should be installed and commissioned, the person who installs and maintains the system over its service life may not.  Service contractors do not want to deal with the resulting incorrect installations and “orphan systems”.  Experience has shown that this is all too common with hydronics systems, and represents an impediment to further market acceptance of hydronics technology. This session describes proper system documentation including piping schematics, electrical control schematics, descriptions of operation, initial controller settings, and installation details. You will also learn about relatively inexpensive software tools for creating proper documentation. 

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